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  • New Rig Opens Collingwood Shale Play


    From the May 2010 issue of The Land Rig Newsletter:

    The State Pioneer 1-3 well was drilled by Pollister Rig #2, a new rig that was built last year to drill Prairie Du Chien (PdC) wells to around 12,000 ft. The rig had been working in Osceola County, Florida, for BreitBurn Operating before returning to Michigan for the Petoskey well. According to rig owner Ed Pollister, the Michigan well posed no problems. Once the vertical section was drilled, the well was plugged back and kicked off without a whipstock.

    Standard rotary steerable technology was used for the lateral drill. Liner setting went smoothly, as did the multistage frac. The rig is a diesel-electrical unit with 750 hp drawworks, a 131 ft mast, and dual 1,000-hp Triplex mud pumps. It is rated to 14,000 ft, uses a standard hoist and traveling block system, and racks back three-joint stands of 4½-in. drill pipe along with 9-in. drill collars. Pollister says he is already booked through yearend with PdC wells and hopes to finalize additional drilling commitments that will secure work into mid-2011. With a limited number of larger rigs available in Michigan, more and larger rigs will need to be shipped ...

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  • CT Drilling Finding Its Niche

    From the March 2010 issue of The Land Rig Newsletter:


    Will coiled tubing (CT) drilling ever be more than a rare niche application in the Lower 48 states? A research project by the US Department of Energy in the past decade underscored the potential of using modular hybrid CT rigs to drill ultrasmall-diameter holes to develop marginally economic plays (the Microhole program); that effort opened up a significant shallow Niobrara gas play in Nebraska. Subsequent commercial CT drilling by BP in Oklahoma’s Anadarko basin (horizontal CTD re-entries in the Cleveland tight gas sands) also showed promise, and CT drilling has been a staple on Alaska’s North Slope and in Canada for years.

    But the Lower 48 industry is still loath to pursue this technology, according to a Stewart & Stevenson representative at ICoTA’s annual meeting in The Woodlands, Tex., this month, because US drillers feel that jointed-pipe rigs can drill as fast as CT rigs and provide more flexibility to deal with downhole problems.  Still, CT drilling capabilities are improving as heavy-wall, larger-diameter coil is put to work. The rigs are being used to drill 4–5-in. geothermal holes using 2 7/8 in. heavy wall coil in the western U.S. ...

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